MAKING A FLAG WITH ARCHER TRANSFERS

Making a flag is quite simple, just align both sides, slip a piece of aluminum or lead foil between the two halves, burnish and trim to size.

TRIM TRANSFER FROM SHEET

Cut out both sides of the flag from the sheet. Do not cut the paper backing, you will need the backing later.

FASTEN ONE HALF TO A HARD BASE

Tape one side of the flag, face down to a light table, window or light colored hard surface.

ALIGN BOTH HALVES

Carefully align the other half over the first and secure along one side with a piece of tape. This piece of tape will act as a hinge.

NOTE: Do not apply pressure during this step because it will cause the halves to stick together and be ruined.

 

PLACE FOIL BETWEEN HALVES

Slide a piece of aluminum (shown) or lead foil between the halves. Aluminum foil will yield a much more wrinkled appearance. Lead foil will hold a smoother shape. Use whichever you prefer. In model building, lead foil has always been most associated with flags even though it has the finished appearance of canvas. I recommend aluminum foil because it can be forced down over intricate surfaces such as stowage.

NOTE: If you are using foil, Heavy Duty or Regular is fine.

TRANSFER FLAGS ONTO FOIL
Rub over the transfer carrier film with a burnishing tool, cuticle pusher (available at a Beauty Supply store) or #2 pencil until you can see that the entire flag has separated from the carrier film. Apply more pressure than you would use to apply a regular transfer because you are transferring two transfers at one time in this step.
PEEL BACK CARRIER FILM
Carefully peel back the top piece of carrier film and discard it.
BURNISH
Lay the paper backing paper over the transfer and burnish firmly to insure a strong bond of both halves.
PEEL FOIL BACK
Carefully peel back the foil to separate the other half of flag from its carrier film. Discard the remaining carrier film and tape.
TRIM EXCESS FOIL
Using a NEW blade, carefully trim away the excess foil. Do this with SEVERAL LIGHT PASSES to avoid tearing the foil.
SHAPE

The inks we use are very flexible and allow you to crumple the flag into any severe shape or force it down over an uneven surface.

NOTE: The red smudges on the cutting mat are paint, not ink from the transfer.

IMPORTANT NOTES ON CLEARS: Although not necessary, a mist coat of lacquer can be applied if desired, but a heavy, wet coat of lacquer can cause certain colors to bleed. Any acrylic clear can be used without fear of color bleed. It is only wet coats of solvent based clears that will cause problems.